fbpx

Talking Cloud Security with OpenEYE and Feenics

Andy:

Good Friday everyone, or at least it’s Friday when we’re recording this thing, but I’m here with Kyle with OpenEye and Paul with Phoenix. And we’re going to talk about the benefits of cloud security and I’m not talking about like cyber security necessarily. What I’m talking about is actually moving your infrastructure and interfaces and all sorts of stuff like that from being physical boxes on site to actual cloud compliance, cloud enabled devices. And these are the two guys that know it the best, and they basically wrote the book on cloud, at least in the security market. Kyle, you want to start us off with kind of an overview of security in the cloud?

Kyle:

Yeah. Absolutely Andy, thanks for having me on. Yeah, cloud technology has been around for quite some time in the IT landscape. And just in the last few years, the physical security world has really kind of gravitated towards it and adopted a lot of the benefits behind it. From a physical standpoint, it generally means using somebody else’s servers offsite across a land connection, but from just kind of a broader stroke standpoint, it means a more efficient way to access, manage and use these systems. And so ultimately that’s what’s motivated a lot of these providers in our space to start adopting in some form or fashion cloud technology. And I’m excited to be talking with you quite a bit more about that here today.

Andy:

Okay. Paul, you got anything to add to that?

Paul:

No, I think Kyle did a great job of wrapping it up and it’s something that’s over the last five years has really been a hot discussion in the physical security landscape. And again, not something traditionally that’s been done, but as a cloud becomes much more advantageous and ready for a commercial application, as the bandwidth become larger and larger and usable just from about anywhere, hotspots popping up everywhere, cloud providers popping up everywhere. The industry is ready and commercial spaces ready as well to take advantage of the advantages.

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). And I will say that being in the cloud and having partners in the cloud works best because they talk the same language. So the interfacing between things is a lot easier and a lot smoother. You guys have a great interaction, integration between access control and cloud. Well, yeah. Between cloud video and access, do you guys want to kind of talk briefly about the integration between the two of you guys and how that works in the cloud?

Paul:

Sure. I’ll start that one off. So first of all, the relationship between OpenEye and Phoenix started probably four or five years ago. Although, I’ve known this company for the last 20, since they really started, but what really has changed the landscape and made what we’ve done capable has been a number of things. Cloud has definitely been a piece of it, but what’s also going on in the technology sector is being able to create APIs that no longer are proprietary, but are open. So we both operate off of, what they call a restful API and restful API essentially allows the fewest integration to happen. And to take it one step further, what’s really happening between our two cloud platforms is, that when we do an update on our end, us being Phoenix on the access control, it automatically synchronizes with the API on OpenEye’s OWS platform. So they receive it. It automatically updates within their system and we don’t have to do any kind of update of what they typically would call a plugin. A plugin is something that always had to be updated to keep these integrations going in the past and that no longer exist.

Paul:

And now when OpenEye does an update on their end and it gets sent down and now we see it, we automatically digest it and realize it’s now part of what we’re doing, so we don’t have to do an update. So we automatically accept the features and new capabilities within their system. So it becomes a bi-directional integration, number one, and number two, it eliminates the additional work that had to be done on the back end of downloading these plugins, of keeping these plugins up to date. And that in the end just becomes a better user experience for the customer.

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kyle:

Yeah, just to contrast against what that used to look like on legacy platforms and legacy connections is, you remove a lot of these points of failures that historically existed from an integration standpoint. It used to be that you had to handshake all of these individual servers remotely across each other. And if one of them broke, you lost that link. And the beauty is when we ingest everything up into one central management platform that those management platforms have to talk. And so it just provides a lot more stability in the system, but it also makes deployment significantly easier because you don’t have to touch all of these end points for the integration to talk, so it really streamlines that piece. I’ve known integrators that have avoided doing software to software integrations back in the day, because historically they were known to break. Company A wouldn’t tell company B about a thing and you go to do an upgrade on one and that direct IP relationship would break. And so it just bakes in a lot more stability in that relationship.

Paul:

And by the way, what used to happen years ago is that you had this thing and this is going to be a curse word in today’s world is, middleware. So middleware developers were popping up all over the map because they would say, “I’ll manage that for you. I’ll go ahead and create.” And so now there’s another piece of software that had to be bolted in, there was another cost that had to be added in and they would be sort of the compromising solution that would manage these changes that would happen. And again, so you added more complexity, you added more potential failure points as Kyle mentioned to the system. A very antiquated way of doing things. And now, between restful APIs, using the cloud as the way to handshake in the middle of being on the same platforms, has just made things so much more seamless for everybody.

Kyle:

Yeah. And it used to be too, capability was almost synonymous with complexity and the cloud has kind of flipped that around where you have more capability with less complexity. And I think that’s one of the things that’s really been attractive about cloud technology in general, is it gives you so much more and it’s requiring so much less, and that’s a huge benefit to anybody that’s looking at it.

Andy:

Let’s talk a little bit about kind of, one of the biggest benefits is kind of future-proofing it because there’s no longer stuff that becomes out date because now everything is running on a server in a data warehouse. A, you get redundancy there because it’s on multiple data centers. So there’s some redundancy there, but it’s also, there’s no hardware to update. I think you guys in the OpenEye world rolled some stuff out earlier this year that was very reactive to COVID, but you did it like super fast because it was in the cloud and you didn’t have to roll a truck to update it.

Kyle:

Yeah. One of the nice things about cloud technology is that it generally comes with the ability to push updates down from the cloud to all of these individual locations. And so you don’t have to roll trucks to get in and actually physically update software on a box or establish some sort of VPN or remote viewer. You have this single interface to manage all of that and so as things evolve, whether suddenly over time we can push important updates down. Cybersecurity is a key area where sometimes a vulnerability gets discovered and we need to address it as quickly as possible. And I think we saw that to your point Andy, with COVID, where it changed the landscape around how these systems get used. And a lot of organizations needed to deploy elevated skin temperature cameras and the beauty is, we were able to push those features into our platform and into our customer’s hands in a very short amount of time, thanks to what cloud management means to these technologies.

Paul:

Yeah. We took … I shouldn’t say we took advantage of it. We actually reacted to what was going on in this changing environment. So we became a very virtualized workforce over the last year. And fortunately, we’re now in an area now of our life where technology has allowed us to do this. And I said, this many, a time over this last 8, 10 months is that, if this would have happened 10, 15 years ago, which seems like eons ago, this would have been difficult to do because the platforms weren’t ready to do this virtualized work environment. When things started coming up of saying, “Okay, well there’s going to be some people that do have to go to an office. There’s going to be some people that do need to go in.” We added a functionality as well. Again, similar to what OpenEye did. So the whole idea of becoming touch-less as fast as possible. So we interacted and did integrations to platforms that allowed biometrics to use facial recognition, to recognize if a mask was on, to also have a camera, an integrated camera to take a temperature checks as well.

Paul:

In addition, we looked at things such as contact trace reports. So when you look at contact tracing, if Jane Doe got tested and was found to be positive, we wanted to know all the points of contact that she was involved with at the door level. I mean, those physical points, what did she touch? So we could run reports based around a minute, an hour, a time gate stamp, every door that she touched. And then what we did, is it said, “Everybody that came within contact of that same area, the same door in the last five minutes, 10 minutes.” Whatever you set the parameters to be, it could run that report for the last week or 10 days, whatever you wanted. And now you could actually address these things. You could talk to these people one-on-one and let them know the vulnerability or the issue that just happened with Jane.

Paul:

And then lastly, the whole idea of occupancy area. I mean, we’ve all walked into workspaces where there were just large bullpen of people, desk back to back, back to back. Well, we no longer can put 50, 60 people in a room because we knew we needed to space accordingly. So we could actually track the number of people that were going in and coming out. And essentially, even if I had access to a particular area, I would be denied access because we were already at maximum capacity in that area. So again, some of the things we’d built in very, very quickly to meet the current environment we’re in, in 2020.

Kyle:

Yeah. And I think there were a lot of organizations that were really concerned about or focused on keeping people out of the office for a crucial time there and that was a key priority. And I think if you look at what OpenEye’s platform and Phoenix’s platform allowed those users to do is, update all of these technologies, adapt to these dynamics, but without needing somebody to be out there installing software updates on every location, on every machine. Is that you got this innovation as you needed it, without that additional risk to people by having outside bodies come in. So I think that COVID really was an accelerant around how important remote capability is for organizations. And I think we’re seeing that in physical security in a big way because of COVID.

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). If could kind of jump over to that subject, just about the ease of, as far as us as an integrator role. We don’t have to roll a truck to go fix many of the problems. Maybe you had a receptionist that clicked the wrong button. We have complete transparency in there. So we can go in and just fix it right here. And we don’t have to roll a truck versus, “Oh, you need that new feature? Well, now that’s an additional this and this. And we got to come out and spend time programming it and backing up and all this other stuff.” Where it’s like, “Okay, click done.” That future-proofing side of things is kind of huge because there’s no out dating of the processor and the servers and all that stuff because they’re constantly being updated and you’re not having to budget every five years to replace something. You guys have anything to elaborate with the kind of future-proofing of it.

Paul:

Yeah. I mean, if you start with just from a hardware perspective, hardware has as a certain life cycle in general. And so, one of the first things you consider is that, how do you update that hardware remotely? Well, before in the past, things were done through VPNs and other ways of getting in there. So you’re now actually, and we’ll talk about cyber here in a minute, but you’re creating a cyber risk because you’re now opening something up and allowing the rest of the world potentially to tunnel in. And cyber became such a highly focused area in 2020 because of this virtualized environment we’re in.

Paul:

But to get back to the point of this constant real-time updates that are happening. I mean, we push out updates on a monthly basis. Sometimes they’re as simple as a small fix or a patch within the system. But when I look at this, what you see with what Microsoft has done now for 365, Office 365. I turn my computer on and do I worry about what version I’m on at that particular moment? The answer is no, because I’m always on the latest and greatest version. The worst I’m going to get is a pop-up that says, “Hey, I got some new updates when you shut down and open up the next time, you’re going to get all these updates.” And we’re doing the same thing. So again, it’s a fixed or a patch or a new feature or functionality, these things are all done or they’re all pushed down natively to the application. So you’re seeing the latest and greatest of all the capabilities.

Andy:

Yep.

Kyle:

Yeah. And I’d say, what’s great about that from like just an enterprise user management standpoint too is, so much beyond just the install and configure is you’re not having to … The browser, or I’m sorry, the cloud actually brings this wonderful thing that is browser access to these historically thick client driven interfaces. And so if you’re an operation that has hundreds of sites and thousands of users, the ability for folks to access via any browser, whether or not they get a new laptop or they’ve had one for three years. It really is one less thing that you have to worry about updating and managing and touching and configuring. And so I think, when you look at future-proofing, it’s also about controlling that IT resource within the organization and knowing that, “Hey, as we scale as a company, we’re not going to have to invest all of this additional head count into supporting these systems that are going to scale as well.”

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). I guess that kind of rolls into software as a service.

Paul:

Yeah. Yeah, it does. I was going to actually kind of talk about the software as a service and the benefit to the end user. Ultimately, the customer experience is what you’re looking to promote to get a highly satisfied customer. So the realization is, is where these things are all deployed is in a business that doesn’t do access control or video. That’s not their main stream. They’re out there to make a dollar in some other world. So when they hire a value added reseller, their expectation is that you guys are the experts, you know what you’re doing, which is a true statement. Because what you’re now able to do is, if the end user and Andy, you kind of alluded to this earlier is, if somebody makes a mistake that is managing these systems, the remote capability that you can provide to address, fix something remotely before you would have to roll a truck. Or maybe you figure out if you will have to roll a truck as they call it, or just set up a service call.

Paul:

But let’s take it one step further. The reality is we’re taking personnel and at an end user side, and we’re asking them to do something that’s not traditional, would they do? We’re going to ask you to manage the database. We’re going to ask you to add access control levels or remove access control levels that are at holiday schedules or to do specific things within the camera system. That’s just not their forte. So what you, as a service provider can say is, “Look, I’ve got an idea. Why don’t we do a lot of these things for you. We can do all those capabilities remotely. We can add and delete people. We can manage your system on site. We can make sure the schedules are set up properly. We can run reports for you. How about if we run a report, when you like it, every Monday at 8:30? You will have it in your inbox, guaranteed on the reports that you want me to do.”

Paul:

So that service now is actually … You’re adding that value to the value added reseller portion of this and the comfort level that the end user gets, as far as I’m concerned is, you know what you’re doing, I’m trusting you. It’s worth my money to pay you. We’ve actually created through total cost of ownership calculators that shows, if I can take Jane from doing a second and third job and just have her focus on what we hired her for. And now we turn this over to IS3 Tech as a service provider and say, “You do this, it’s worth it because we know it’s going to be done right.” And when you’re looking at security, do I really want to take the chance of a risk of somebody accidentally leaving a door open or hitting an access level, which may create a completely open environment on a Saturday and Sunday? That’s a high risk to take.

Kyle:

Yeah, that’s a great point, Paul. I think historically, having that integrator touch your system that frequently was just cost prohibitive. It required that, that person was on site all the time. And so most organizations kind of offloaded that responsibility to Jane or Tom, because that’s just the most cost effective way and we have to figure it out. But I think we’ve talked a lot about the benefit to the end user accessing these systems. But I think what the cloud also brings is it gives you more connectivity for your supporting integrator as well, so that you can leverage that subject matter expert who touches and manages these systems every day. And you can do it in a cost-effective way. So you’re getting that expertise, but you’re not needing a truck rolled every time you’re, you’re getting that support.

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah. So I guess the other bigger question is, since it’s in the cloud, how secure is?

Paul:

Great question. So we can address this in a number of ways. And the first one is, let’s talk about, from a cyber perspective or from an IP perspective. If you talk to any IT personnel, that’s actually running an infrastructure of some kind, the last thing they ever want to do is open ports. So inbound ports is just a big red X at any point. We’re both going outbound port, so our communication path is, we’re taking something, we’re shooting outbound, which means essentially, this is no different than us what we’re doing here. We’re basically communicating with the internet outbound, we’re shooting out, finding an internet protocol, a Mac address, wherever it may be. And then we’re making that communication path open. As soon as that handshake is done out in the cloud, pushing outbound. Now we got kind of a two way communication stream going. That’s the first thing that happens.

Paul:

The encryption part is also another thing that’s really important. And again, I know this because of the integration that we’ve done between OpenEye and Phoenix, we’re both using the highest levels of encryption on both what they call a transit and at rest within our protocols. Those things are important because what you want is to make sure those packets of information that are traveling from point A to point B, can’t be intercepted and can’t be unwrapped and figured out what’s in there. That encryption is critical in a security environment. So that’s what we’re doing from the encryption standpoint.

Paul:

I know from Phoenix’s standpoint, a couple other things we do is we have outside organizations that do both penetration testing with our product, and they do code assessment. And these are being done on dynamic events. So they’re constantly looking for and sniffing out, to make sure that we’re not causing any vulnerability at the end user level.

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kyle:

Yeah, I think that’s a great point.

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Do you guys have anything else that you’d like to add to this?

Kyle:

Yeah, I think one area that’s really evolved or innovated is, how cloud technology impacts organizations and monitoring and managing the health of these systems. I think we’ve talked a lot about using them, deploying them, but historically it wasn’t uncommon for a camera to go offline or a server to have a drive fail or maybe a door reader to go offline and nobody would know until it was too late. Until you had a queue of people waiting to badge in at 9:05 or until you went to pull an event. One of the really powerful things that cloud technology brings to this equation is, in conjunction with a value added reseller, is we can give real time intelligence around those events so that folks can address those before they become an issue or before you need that evidence and you don’t have it. Or you need access to that building and you don’t have it.

Kyle:

And so I know some very large organizations that stand up teams internally to ensure that those things don’t happen, but they do it in a very manual, labor intensive way. And the cloud essentially can replace some of that time and labor in watching over these blinking lights, if you will, that is our systems.

Paul:

Yeah. And I was thinking about this as Kyle was going through this, is the fact that when you take arena that we’re in right now, and consider … Again, let’s go back to future-proofing but let’s look ahead a little bit. Technology changes fast. It’s a blink of an eye. So when you typically put something in, in the past. Again, we’re all looking at our laptops and the day we buy them, they’re obsolete in a week. So we realize the next one comes out, it’s got the same horsepower, same everything. It’s now for less money, or they’ve added more power for the same money, one of the other. How do we stay ahead of that curve long enough to continue to advance and get the benefit out of it?

Paul:

And we’re starting to hear things, the whole idea of machine learning, AI. So analytics that are coming about more and more. How do you actually get the benefit of those things if you’re not utilizing the scalability of the cloud or the capability of the cloud to not only scale, but to be able to deliver the experience and get those updates out to the end user, as fast as we can now in the cloud involvement? And to look the way that happens typically, requires more horsepower. When we look at the elasticity of what the cloud can provide of more and more horsepower, of being able to back up and have this redundancy on a consistent basis going on. And we utilize EC2 services in Amazon, which really just means that we’re bouncing off of multiple availability zones. So it’s just constant backup happening. In the past, if we were on site and we had a server, we’re looking at the server room. That telco closet with all those racks of stuff in there, if that went down and that wasn’t backed up your whole organization was out.

Paul:

So we’re being backed up in multiple [inaudible 00:25:58] and when we think about some of the biggest players out there that are utilizing cloud, we think of somebody like a Netflix. How are they able to deliver movies on command like they do to tens of millions of people in nanoseconds? They’ve got to use the cloud to be able to push that out. So again, major benefits and that’s where the whole technology basis is going.

Kyle:

Yeah. I want to add one thing too. I know we talked about cyber security. I think a lot of people will talk about it in the perspective of zeros and ones. Just kind of open inbound ports but from an organizational standpoint, it’s really about access at a user level too. And so cybersecurity can be two factor authentication, but one of the nice things that the cloud brings as a value add to just managing users and ultimately accesses, you’ve got a central database and a central management point for all of those users. Whether they’re card holders or their video users, if that person leaves the organization, we want that access to be terminated immediately. And so the beauty of cloud management is that we can come in and any of those changes are applied instantaneously. And so contrasting that to the way that we historically used to manage these platforms is, in some cases that user management lived at every location on the server.

Kyle:

And so if you didn’t have remote connectivity or physical connectivity to get in and pull out John Doe, he was in there and a risk to the organization until you did. And so we make it easier, we make it more instantaneous. The moment that that person leaves the organization on Friday, those permissions are gone regardless of whether or not they have browser access or not. And so I think there’s a big element too, that having user management, centralized management in general, gives organizations more control over the access to these systems.

Paul:

Yeah. And that centralized command, as Kyle talked about, in years past, first of all, it wasn’t very doable and if you were doing it, you were basically again, VPNing into a server somewhere to actually activate that. We can do all that. I mean, we walk around with these things, we never leave their side anymore, the phones, we’re sleeping with them. It’s the reality of it because they’re no longer a phone. It really is. It’s a computer that we’re walking around with. So to be able to do that on the fly.

Paul:

So somebody that runs a business, if there’s a failure point somewhere, or if there’s somebody has to be released, or if there’s somebody that needs to be removed from the system for whatever the reason. If I can do that while I’m on vacation with my family just immediately and not think twice about it. Not have to not have to drive back to the office, not have to drive back to get my laptop, physically do it directly from my phone and get that benefit. And I’m talking to a centralized database. It’s just basically like me with my computer right in front of me. I mean, that’s tremendous. The power of being able to do that without being able to connect again, to a localized network is huge.

Kyle:

Yeah. Yeah. Paul, and I’m sure you get these conversations a lot, but I think it’s probably helpful for the audience on here to talk about what migration looks like. From both the physical transition of legacy systems to what we’ve talked about today, but also what that means from a budgetary standpoint and what I think the VSaaS means for expediting adoption of these technologies. I think that’d be an area that would be really beneficial for folks to get some insight on. I mean, what’s been your experience on that side?

Paul:

Yeah. That’s a great question, Kyle. I mean, there’s no doubt … So anybody that’s had a legacy deployment out there for quite some time, obviously they put a lot of money into that. So is anything salvageable? So is there a way we can actually create a migration path that may reduce that cost of ownership a little bit? And from our perspective, from the access control side, what we’ve made a conscious decision of, is that we are not a hardware supplier or a builder of hardware, a platform. We build software and then we go and source ourselves to the best open-ended technology that’s out there. And what we’ve done is, we’ve attached ourselves to probably the most open-ended platform in the access control space and happens to be called Mercury, which basically all they do is build hardware. They don’t build software.

Paul:

And so they source their hardware out to 30 plus software manufacturers, which in this case happens to be the global dominant platform. So if somebody has a system that’s already what they call Mercury based, we can take all that over, that whole entire infrastructure can be taken over reused, repurposed. Essentially, we call flash or basically take over those controllers. And now all that infrastructure … I mean, we just did a system just within the last couple of weeks, that was over a couple 100 card readers and it didn’t cost them a penny on the hardware. We just took over all the access controlled field hardware, basically had to talk to us instead of talking to the other platform. And all they had to do is get the access controls, the service up and running, which saved them just a tremendous amount of money.

Paul:

And even if it’s not Mercury, all of the traditional appliances or applications around the door, your locks, your strikes, all those things can be reused. The wiring harness can be reused. That labor reduces that cost as well. So again, we are very conscientious of considering that migration path to take the least amount of burden off their plate and cost off their plate.

Kyle:

Yeah. We kind of hear and feel the same thing on the video side of that equation too. I think when people see and hear like a radically new technology and approach, they assume, “Well, I’ve got to rip and replace everything I’ve already spent money on in order to get there.” And I think it’s helpful to note, that a lot of these platforms are being built with that legacy infrastructure in mind and helping provide a migration path to the future. But in a way that doesn’t tell you to throw out perfectly good assets. And so we do the same thing with cameras. In some cases, we actually leverage existing NVRs to still get life out of that asset as well, but helping people get onto these platforms with a lower cost of entry.

Kyle:

And I think software as a service is something that we’re doing a little bit differently too, collectively Paul as well. It kind of helps with that justification as well, where historically the market really wanted you to pay upfront for software, kind of the old Microsoft model and kind of really expensive or heavy lift on day one. And we’ve really softened that migration through a software as a service approach as well.

Paul:

Yeah. The whole idea that you’re … When you put something in today, if you’re a year from now, essentially have gotten the latest and greatest over the course of that year. And we’ve all gotten accustomed to paying for something in a monthly basis, but we get the benefit of it. So we get all the new updates, we get all the new functionality and features that may come along with that. We get all the updates, we get all the backups. So all that again, becomes that comfort level to know that our system is in real time, the most up-to-date platform at all times. And again, you can’t do that in a traditional server based application, where you pay for all that upfront. And like Kyle said, probably at a much higher level of cost right out of the CapEx and people are actually more comfortable with moving to an operational expenditure because it’s something they can build into their budget on a consistent basis.

Paul:

It’s like your phone bill, if I want to use this, there’s a cost to it, but I know I can build that into my budget because it’s usually consistently the same number on a monthly basis. I’m getting all the updates out of this. I’m getting the cyber updates out of this and I still get the usage of it in that plan that I have. Again, that’s something there’s a comfort level from that standpoint. And I know if I need to reach out to support, I can because that’s part of the benefit of what I get out of this.

Kyle:

Yeah. Yeah. I liked the approach of software as a service because like we just discussed, it used to be this big lumpy upfront cost and then you’d pay ongoing annually to kind of keep your future-proof, if you will. And I think what we’ve done is really lowered the barrier to entry by offering it in a software as a service model. And I think Paul mentioned a platform that’s really kind of done that in spades earlier, which is Netflix. I think a lot of people really, they leveraged software as a service every day and they very rarely recognize it. And we talked about Microsoft 365 and Netflix and Spotify, we’re doing all these things now, but we ask these organizations to constantly improve the content and the quality and the features. And that’s ultimately what software as a service allows the market to do as well.

Paul:

Yeah. Just to kind of close or put closure on this, is that I think the end user really wants to look at what is my time worth? So what is my time worth to constantly worry about the updates on these things? Are the systems incompatible? I’ve got a server on here that’s running, what version of Windows, is it running a version of Windows? Is it Linux? Is it something else? So you’ve got all these things that they’ve got to be taken into play. And if I can take all those things off my plate, if I can reduce the amount of hours I got to spend on a security platform and actually take my time and effort and put it towards the benefit of the business, whatever that may be. My business may be a retail outfit that has a website, that’s critical to have my uptime because if my customers can’t order online, then they can’t receive the benefit of what we offer.

Paul:

So if I’ve got to worry about that, but I really … A security platform, if I can take that off my plate because it’s all being handled on the backend, then again, there’s a comfort level to that. And now I’ve reduced my cost as well, even more because I don’t have to put people towards that, eliminate those resources.

Andy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kyle:

Yeah, absolutely. I think collectively we’re addressing a lot of kind of common issues and inefficiencies for organizations that have met downtime or lost operational benefit. And so the cloud is kind of changing the way that we live and interact with these, but it’s giving a lot back to the customers that are using it. That seems to be the big primary motivation is, a lot of organizations that are upgrading, they’ve used a system in the past. They’ve seen how much time, investment is needed to manage and support and maintain. And so we’re seeing a gravitation from that side of the market the most.

Andy:

If we can help you with any of the technology in your building, whether it’s surveillance, access control, security, AV, networking, head over to our website, scroll down and fill out that contact form. We’ll be happy to answer any questions, make some suggestions for ways to better improve the technology in your space.

 

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *